assiniboine & sioux rural water supply system

 


The Fort Peck Reservation is home to two separate Indian nations, each composed of numerous bands and divisions.

The Sioux divisions of Sisseton, Wahpetons, the Yanktonais, and the Teton Hunkpapa are all represented.

The Assiniboine bands of Canoe Paddler and Red Bottom are represented.

The Reservation is located in the extreme northeast corner of Montana, on the north side of the Missouri River.


Assiniboine & Sioux Rural Water Supply System
703 2nd Ave. West
P.O. Box 1027
Poplar, MT 59255
P:406.768.5719
F:406.653.5721

 

 

Benefits

The water project will address the serious water problems facing the region. Ground water in northeastern Montana contains concentrations of sulfates and total dissolved solids that exceed the safe drinking water guidelines set forth by the EPA.

These contaminants affect the taste and general acceptability of water. More than 80% of the private systems on the Fort Peck Reservation have documented nitrate levels above safe drinking standards. The region's ground water also suffers from contamination resulting from oil and gas development. High levels of iron, and manganese are additional water quality issues.

Many rural residents cannot use their existing water source without extensive treatment. Reverse osmosis, filtering, distilling or softening will not be necessary when using treated Missouri River water. Offensive color, odor and taste will be eliminated.

Additional cost savings include extending the usable life of faucets, hot water heaters, appliances, and clothes. Eliminating the need for bottled water, water softening, and excessive cleaning supplies will also reduce water related expenses.


"ASRWSS is committed to delivering clean, affordable and dependable drinking water that will improve the quality of life and create economic opportunities throughout northeast Montana."

Secondary Menu

 


Assiniboine & Sioux Rural Water Supply System - ASRWSS

 

Looking at the west side of the Contact Basin from south of the structure